Movin’ Cows At The Ranch Pen

IMG_0713Moving Cows by Don Dane

Last fall, Gramps and I visited Silver Dollar City at Branson, MO, as we do every year or two, but we happened along during the park’s Harvest and Cowboy Festival, which suited us just about right. One section of the park had been reserved for the cowboy stuff: a couple of wild west shows, a guy talking about mustang adoption (he demonstrated with a nifty little filly he was training), a cowboy cook who happens to live not far from us here in southwest Oklahoma and who makes a mean cornbread in a cast-iron dutch oven, and a barn full of western crafts-people of different skills. Don Dane from Olathe, KS, was one of the artists. I loved all the work he had done, but especially the watercolor called Moving Cows. Gramps remembered that from September until December–who says miracles don’t happen?–and I woke up to that beautiful print on Christmas morning.  (If you click on the link above, it’ll take you to the Fine Art America website where you can purchase your own print, or view some of Mr. Dane’s other work.)

As an ultra-conservative Christian woman, I believe art should reflect the Creator or it’s just an object. I only had one brief conversation with Mr. Dane so I don’t know what his religious beliefs are, but I’m pretty positive he believes in God just by looking at Moving Cows, reflecting as it does the glory of God in the sunrise–or sunset–and time well spent.

Until next time, God bless all y’all and enjoy Jake Hooker singing one of my favorites, Cattle On A Thousand Hills.

*This artist doesn’t necessarily endorse my blog, I just love the job he does on this song

Western Art At The Ranch Pen On Almost Wordless Wednesday

The End of the Trail by James Earle Fraser

The End of the Trail
James Earle Fraser (1876-1953)
Plaster (approximately 17′ x 14′ x 5′)
National Cowboy & Western Heritage Museum,
Oklahoma City

Over the weekend, Gramps and I drove to Oklahoma City where in our countrified way we sought to better our minds with some culture at the National Cowboy and Western Heritage Museum.

Canyon Princess by Gerald Balciar

Canyon Princess by Gerald Balciar. She is 15′ tall and carved from Colorado marble, weighing over eight tons

The two sculptures above are worth the visit, but we happened to stumble into the cowboy museum while the Walter Ufer exhibit was featured and I’m happy we did.

A lot of Walter Ufer’s paintings feature pueblo people of the southwest in the early part of the last century, particularly around Taos, New Mexico.

Taos Indian and Pack Horse by Walter Ufer

Taos Indian and Pack Horse by Walter Ufer

Taos Women by Walter Ufer

Taos Women by Walter Ufer

As a horse person, I naturally like his paintings that include horses. And he captures the lights, shadows and colors of the desert southwest so well.

Late Afternoon by Walter Ufer

Late Afternoon by Walter Ufer

I’ll leave everyone to draw their own conclusions about this, but he seemed to be quite fond of…well…himself. He painted a number of self-portraits.

Walter Ufer by Walter Ufer

Walter Ufer by Walter Ufer

Then we entered the Allan Houser and his students collection of Native American art. Allan Houser was an Apache and an amazing sculptor and painter.

Smoke Signal by Allan Houser

Smoke Signal by Allan Houser

Then we moved on to the permanent art collection which features my favorite painting by artist Tom Lovell.

Target Practice by Tom Lovell

Target Practice by Tom Lovell

And another favorite by Wilson Hurley of the Grand Canyon. (I am not entirely sure of the title on this painting, so I apologize if I didn’t get it right.)

The Grand Canyon--face of Creation by Wilson Hurley

The Grand Canyon–Face of Creation by Wilson Hurley

Then we entered the Prix De West gallery which is full of the most amazing western art known to man.

Grand Canyon--Kaibab Trail by Clark Hulings

Grand Canyon–Kaibab Trail by Clark Hulings

(One of the best times in my whole life-span was spent riding mules into the Grand Canyon for two days, so when an artist captures that breath-taking view with paint, I am in awe. I don’t believe in reincarnation, but if I did, I would want to come back as an ol’ gal tough enough to pack mules up and down the Kaibab trail every day. Absolutely amazing.)

Spring's Caprice by Curt Walters

Spring’s Caprice by Curt Walters

What unbelievable talent.

Then finally, one of my top ten favorite western artists, Tim Cox. He’s never painted anything I didn’t love.

On To Better Pastures by Tim Cox

On To Better Pastures by Tim Cox

(We are in a severe drought situation and all our pastures are short. Gramps said, “Wow. That looks like pretty good pasture to me.”)

Well, that concludes the tour. Hope you enjoyed. Until next time, God bless all y’all.