Anecdotes From The Ranch Pen

border collie on atv

Nellie preparing for a career in some sort of Extreme Sport in case the stock dog thing doesn’t work out

A Little Too Loosely?

Today, we’ve got a post chock full of short anecdotes from the Ranch Pen. The official definition of anecdote is included below to assist y’all in determining if the term is perhaps used too loosely here.

Anecdote: a short and amusing, or interesting, story about a real incident, or person (or dog)

Coming On Apace

As pictured above, Nellie is in training for a career in Extreme Sports. But first, she has to learn the ‘stay’ command, as in: Stay on the 4 wheeler, Nellie, so you can look cool on the blog. She has also been learning ‘that’ll do’. As in: That’ll do, Nellie. Drop the cat. Now. That’ll do, I said! Blast it all anyhow, that’ll do!

No, Nellie is a smart little gal and her training is coming on apace. She LOVES to ride on the four-wheeler and she knows ‘sit’ and ‘go home’. She also ‘shakes’ which has no useful application, but it’s a charming gesture. I’ve never trained a stock dog before, but I purchased some training books with my birthday money and have been studyin’ on it. What could go wrong?

rescue

Gramps’ fence building rig–DOA

What’s The Number For 911?

On the beautiful morning pictured above, I had to perform a rescue operation for Gramps. His fencing truck’s giddy-up had laid back its ears and died. All he could do was drive in reverse, which gets a person pretty much right back where they started. So, why did you have to rescue him, Danni?–you might be asking. He could’ve just kept backing up til he got back to the ranch, seems like.

Well, apparently Gramps didn’t want to drive for twenty miles in reverse. He’s funny that way and he’s also a little grumpy on occasion.

Gramps (looking testily at Danni standing in the road with her iPhone poised for action): You’re not puttin’ this on the blog are you?

Bwah, ha, ha…

oklahoma sunset

Another Amazing Southwest Oklahoma Sunset

A Genius

After studying the letters below–created by the three-year-old grandson, Einstein–we can only conclude he is a genius.

IMG_4261

Killed By A Swimming Pool?

We keep one of those horribly ugly, bright blue, above-ground swimming pools for the kids’ summer fun, but alas–or, finally, depending on the viewpoint–summer has ended. The nieces came to help drain and roll up the heavy monstrosity. Nellie was no help. She became hysterical–as one of my dog training manuals calls it–with joy. She raced around like a loony tune, leaping about on the drained pool, no doubt puncturing it in a million places. Nellie’s antics were slightly dangerous to everyone, I suppose, but we finally captured her and locked her in her pet taxi to chill out. But then came the part when life was nearly snuffed out. While the nieces lifted the pool sides, I stood inside and dried the thing with towels. The thirty-mile-an-hour breeze–as we who live on western Oklahoma wind farms call it–caught the canvas stuff, ripped it out of the girls’ hands, and whacked me right on the head. Seriously. Swimming pools can kill even without water.

photo

Donating Agnes Campbell’s Hat to the Hobart Oklahoma Public Library with the real Tessa (right)

Thanks Again

And another huge thank you to all of you who have read, or are reading, Agnes Campbell’s Hat and for the nice comments and the reviews on Amazon.com. I love writing for kids and I love knowing they enjoy the stories.

My art students–grandkids, nieces, and assorted others sometimes–which I have dubbed The Rocky Ridge Illustrators, are working on illustrations for several of my other books for kids–Silver Cries Fowl, Mystery At Sheep Camp, and one with the tentative title of Escape From the Inskeletower. We have no release date as yet since my art group’s other names could also be, The Rocky Ridge Snackers, The Rocky Ridge Swimmers, The Rocky Ridge Horseback Riders, and The Rocky Ridge Players.

A Serious Note

On a serious note, the news coming out of South Dakota this week is really terrible. An early blizzard has left many ccattle in western South Dakota dead and the families that depend on them for their livelihoods in trouble. In bad weather conditions like that, cattle turn their tails to the wind and start drifting. If they hit a fence or drop into a ravine, the cattle behind just keep coming, piling on top of each other and suffocating the layers beneath. Early estimates place the livestock loss at at least 75,000 head. I’m sure those ranch and farm families affected would appreciate prayers as they try to figure out where to start dealing with their losses and the massive cleanup.

Until next time, God bless all y’all and enjoy this old clip of The Bishops singing I Need You More Today.

[youtube.com/watch?v=I_KETtbJrqM]

*These artists don’t necessarily endorse my blog, I just like ‘em.

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6 thoughts on “Anecdotes From The Ranch Pen

  1. Blondie says she loves seeing Nellie on the four wheeler. Git’r’done likes his cousin’s “writing a picture”. =)

  2. I love hearing what all’s going on down in OK. My, you are busy (as is Nellie, so it seems). I giggled at Gramps’ question, “you’re not putting this on the blog are you?” because Jonathan asks that incessantly. You’d think they’d’ve learned by now that all things are fair play for the blog. Congratulations on your book–we’re on chapter 3 and loving it! I’ll be sure to write an amazon review once we’re done. Enjoy your weekend, Danni!

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